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scholarship2016

THE GELETT BURGESS CENTER is pleased to announce the Gelett Burgess Young Writer’s Scholarship for high school seniors and college students wishing to pursue careers in writing.

Scholarship recipients will receive funding covering full admission to James Patterson’s Master Class, a program consisting of 22 (one-hour) video lectures covering the art of writing. In addition, winners will receive a collection of writing resources and reference materials to enhance their learning experience.  (Scholarship value $250)

Applicants MUST provide the following information in hardcopy:

(1) One letter of recommendation from an academic advisor or instructor

(2) A brief statement outlining your career goals as a writer (200 words or less)

(3) Three writing samples consisting of any materials you have produced during your course of study (article, class writing assignment, short story, etc).

Download Gelett Burgess Scholarship Fund for Young Writers form here

Submit your package in hardcopy to the Gelett Burgess Center
by Jan 15th, 2016:

Gelett Burgess Center
c/o Nicholas Beatty
908 NE 53rd Avenue
Portland, OR 97213

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pgraphic1-545John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature:

“The Crossover,” written by Kwame Alexander, is the 2015 Newbery Medal winner. The book is published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Two Newbery Honor Books also were named:

“El Deafo” by Cece Bell, illustrated by Cece Bell and published by Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS.

“Brown Girl Dreaming,” written by Jacqueline Woodson and published by Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.

Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:

“The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend,” illustrated by Dan Santat, is the 2015 Caldecott Medal winner. The book was written by Dan Santat and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Six Caldecott Honor Books also were named:

“Nana in the City,” illustrated by Lauren Castillo, written by Lauren Castillo and published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

“The Noisy Paint Box: The  Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art,” illustrated by Mary GrandPré, written by Barb Rosenstock and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc., New York.

“Sam & Dave Dig a Hole,” illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett and published by Candlewick Press.

“Viva Frida,” illustrated by Yuyi Morales, written by Yuyi Morales and published by Roaring Brook Press, a Neal Porter Book.

“The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus,” illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant, and published by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

“This One Summer,” illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki and published by First Second.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

“Brown Girl Dreaming,” written by Jacqueline Woodson, is the King Author Book winner. The book is published by Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.

Three King Author Honor Books were selected:

Kwame Alexander for “The Crossover,” published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing.

Marilyn Nelson for “How I Discovered Poetry,” illustrated by Hadley Hooper and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Books (USA) LLC.

Kekla Magoon for “How It Went Down,” published by Henry Holt and Company, LLC.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

“Firebird,” illustrated by Christopher Myers, is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book was written by Misty Copeland and published by G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC.

Two King Illustrator Honor Book were selected:

Christian Robinson for “Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker,” by Patricia Hruby Powell, published by Chronicle Books LLC.

Frank Morrison for “Little Melba and Her Big Trombone,” by Katheryn Russell-Brown, published by Lee and Low Books, Inc.

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Each year the Gelett Burgess Center offers our network of educators, librarians, bookstores and parents a glimpse into the magic of children’s books, and the incredible role they play in helping children reach their full potential. The books we select represent a talent pool that is inspired to explore new boundaries in children’s literature. We know this is true because incredible children’s books live and breathe truth, and they are the ones that stay with children throughout their entire lives.


Cherish each and every opportunity you have to share a book with a child, whether it be a friendly recommendation or an impromptu bedtime story. These moments are golden and have the potential to change a child’s path forever.

It is with great pleasure we announce the winners of the Gelett Burgess Center, Book of the Year recipients. Many hours have been spent interviewing readers, reviewing new releases, and sifting through bookshelves in order to find the perfect match for our organization. We recognize the creative energy, outstanding talent, and the collaborative nature of creating children’s books. It is with this understanding we offer our thanks and congratulations to the teams responsible for producing this year’s list of winners.

Book of the Year: The Farmer and The Clown by Marla Frazee

“The book opens in a subdued landscape with the grim farmer, whose displeasure is evident when he’s obliged to rescue the young clown thrown from a passing circus train. At first, the farmer and the clown seem in stark contrast. The young clown is dressed in a red one-piece, with a relentlessly cheerful, painted smile, while the old, bent-over farmer has stark black overalls and an unchanging, glum face. But when it is time to wash up, the farmer sheds his black and white clothes and reveals a red one-piece of his own. The clown’s painted smile is wiped off, revealing that the child’s face is actually sorrowful. The emotional resonance of that single mirroring scene is extraordinary. In fact the entire book, with Frazee’s perfect pacing of images and use of negative space, light and shadow is true poetry.” (New York Times Book Review October 19, 2014)

Honor: The Right Word: Roget and his Thesaurus by Jen Bryant

“Those who have relied upon a thesaurus . . . will gain a greater appreciation for the reference tool in this beautifully designed picture book biography of its creator, Peter Roget. . . . Busy and exuberant, Sweet’s charming watercolor illustrations, layered over collages of vintage images and fonts, capture Roget’s passion for classification while also providing readers new opportunities for discovery. . . . Expertly researched and well written, Bryant’s narrative not only details the creation of the thesaurus; it also conveys a sense of Roget the man. . . . An excellent illustrated biography.” School Library Journal

Honor: What Do You Do With An Idea?
by Kobi Yamada

This is the story of one brilliant idea and the child who helps to bring it into the world. As the child’s confidence grows, so does the idea itself. And then, one day, something amazing happens. This is a story for anyone, at any age, who s ever had an idea that seemed a little too big, too odd, too difficult. It s a story to inspire you to welcome that idea, to give it some space to grow, and to see what happens next. Because your idea isn t going anywhere. In fact, it’s just getting started.

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The Gelett Burgess Center realizes the incredible role books play in a child’s development, and this is why we devote our time and energy to finding amazing titles each year to share with Librarians, Educators, Bookstores and Parents. The books we select represent a talent pool that is inspired to explore new boundaries in children’s literature. We know this is true because incredible children’s books live and breathe truth, and they are the ones that stay with children throughout their entire lives.

Do you remember the first book that touched you in some way? Recall those memories and let that energy guide you as you share books with the current generation.  Whatever role you play in a child’s life, express your love of books with them any way you can. Continue searching for the children’s titles that touch you, even as an adult, and let those be the titles you share.

It is with great pleasure we announce the winners of the Gelett Burgess Center, Book of the Year recipients. Many hours have been spent interviewing readers, reviewing new releases, and sifting through bookshelves in order to find the perfect match for our organization. We recognize the creative energy, outstanding talent, and the collaborative nature of creating children’s books. It is with this understanding we offer our thanks and congratulations to the teams responsible for producing this year’s list of winners.

First Place: Snutt the Ift: A Small but Significant Chapter in the Life of the Universe by Helen Ward

Taking readers from a desperately lonely place to the soaring heights of wonder and excitement, Snutt the Ift provides unparalleled emotion and depth of character. Helen Ward’s beautiful story is partnered with sensational illustrations that invite readers to discover a strange new world. The Gelett Burgess Center is honored to name this outstanding children’s picture book as our Book of the Year.- view more

Honor: Little Monk and the Mantis: A Bug, A Boy, and the Birth of a Kung Fu Legend by John Fusco

Little Monk and the Mantis invites children to experience the peaceful teachings at the heart of Martial Arts. With careful attention to detail, John Fusco’s passion for eastern philosophy and historical teachings comes shining through in this tale of perseverance and self-discovery. Children will be enthralled by the masterful storytelling and energetic illustrations that transports readers to another time and place. – view more

Honor: Red Knit Cap Girl by Naoko Stoop

With illustrations remarkable in their innovation and simplicity, Naoko Stoop’s Red Knit Cap Girl offers readers an opportunity to open their eyes and marvel at life’s mysteries. Childlike curiosity and sense of adventure are the true protagonists of this story, weaving children though a tale of discovery and natural beauty. Highly recommended for the child who always asks, “why?” – view more


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The Gelett Burgess Center is pleased to announce the selected titles for our 2012 Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award season. Special care and attention was taken this year in selecting titles from a wide spectrum of the publishing community. Librarians, Educators, Bookstores and Parents will find titles published by large multinational publishing conglomerates, as well as rural small presses. It is our deeply felt conviction that a quality children’s book needn’t be created out of fame and fortune, but a love for the creative process.

Please take a moment to view our 2012 selections, and stay tuned for our Book of the Year awards which will be announced July 9th, 2012.

View the 2012 Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award winning titles for 2012 here.

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